Category Archives: Hindenburg Training

Hindenburg Training – Class 1

Welcome to Hindenburg Training at KFAI.

This is a three part training sequence designed to make you more comfortable with using Hindenburg for editing projects.

In class #1, we’ll learn five key things:

  1. How (and where) to create and save Hindenburg sessions at KFAI
  2. How to import audio into Hindenburg
  3. How to cut audio files
  4. How to re-name audio files in the edit window
  5. How to place audio in the clipboard

#1 – How (and where) to create and save sessions at KFAI

At KFAI, we use Hindenburg on six different computers:

  • Studio 1
  • Studio 2
  • Studio 3
  • Studio 4 (on-air)
  • Newsroom Booth
  • Newsroom Corner

hindenburg_iconAt any of these computers, look for the red “H” Hindenburg icon on the task bar at the  bottom of the screen, or in the program menu.

Before we begin, let’s move some audio into a Workspace folder so you can use it.  At KFAI, the shared drive is the T: drive.  While Hindenburg at any of our computers can read a session that resides on this drive, the safest course is to work with files that live on the local drive of the computer you’re using.

Go to this location to copy your file:

T: / Production / Hindenburg Training / Students / your class year/class month / yourname 

Copy that folder into the Workspace on the local (C: or D:) drive of the machine you’re using.

Now let’s start a session.   Double Left click on the red H  to open Hindenburg.

If you need to start a new session once Hindenburg is already open you can hold down the keys Ctrl and N at the same time.

Start a New Session

  • Keyboard: Ctrl + N
  • Task Bar: New

You can import any audio that can be played on a computer. This also includes audio from video clips. There are four different ways to import audio into your Hindenburg session.

#2 – How to Import Audio into Hindenburg

Import Audio

  • Keyboard: Ctrl + T
  • Task Bar: Import
  • Mouse: Right click – Import
  • Drag & Drop

When you save a Hindenburg session, it is automatically paired with a file folder which contains the source audio for your session.  All audio will be converted to .wav audio format so Hindenburg can work with it.

Save Your Session

  • Keyboard: Ctrl + S
  • Task Bar: Save
  • Task Bar: Save As

Name the session and save it under the appropriate folder (example: C: Workspace/Your Name / My First Hindy Session)

Watch this video that demonstrates various ways of bringing audio into a session and how to understand the editing layout.

Now that you’ve got a clear sense of how the editing space works, let’s use what you’ve just learned to import audio into your Hindenburg session.

 

Inside your training folder on the local drive of the machine where you’re working is a .wav file called “Jumbled ID”.  Import that file into your session. Now you’ve got audio!

#3 – How to Cut Audio in Hindenburg

Watch this video that demonstrates how to work with imported audio.

Now let’s practice some of what you learned on our “Jumbled ID” audio.   We can undo each command using the keyboard function Ctrl + Z

  • Split audio
    • Task Bar: “Split”
    • Mouse: Right Click “Split”
    • Keyboard: Ctrl + B
  • Set IN and OUT markers
    • Mouse: Click and Drag
    • Keyboard: I = “in”, O = “out”
  •  Rehearse an edit (Ctrl-Shift-spaceba
  • Erase In and Out: ESC

Now divide the audio into four chunks.

Chunk 1: “KFAI is 90.3 and 106.7 FM
Chunk 2: music
Chunk 3: “From the top of the IDS Center, this is KFAI FM HD1, Minneapolis
Chunk 4: “Radio Without Boundaries”

It should look something like this when you start …

jumbled_id_1

… and like this when you have divided it into four parts.

jumbled_id_2

 

#4 – How to Re-name Audio Files in the Edit Window

Now let’s re-name each piece of the puzzle.  Highlight a chunk in orange by clicking on it with the arrow.  Then hit “Enter” to open up the piece for re-titling.

jumbled_id_3

Give each chunk a new name.

jumbled_id_4

#5 – How to use the Hindenburg Clipboard

Now let’s learn about the Hindenburg clipboard.

Now let’s move your four audio chunks into the clipboard.  As the video shows, you can do this in several ways:

  • Drag across the audio (creating an “in” and “out” marker), then drag the clip into the clipboard.
  • Highlight the clip so it is orange, then hold “CTRL” and drag the clip into the clipboard
  • Highlight the clip, hold down “CTRL” and “ALT” and press 1, 2, 3 or 4 depending on the clipboard section you would like to have as your destination.

Place each audio chunk in a separate clipboard section.

jumbled_id_5

Once your audio is in the clipboard, you can delete it from the edit space.  Now drag each section back in from the clipboard to re-arrange the Jumbled ID in a way that is most pleasing to you.  Allow yourself to be creative!

jumbled_id_6

Click “Save” on your session.

Finally, let’s update your file on the T: drive.

  • Go to the local drive of your computer, and copy the Hindenburg training folder with your name on it.
  • Go to T: / Production / Hindenburg Training / Students and find your class (ie: June 2017).
  • Paste your copied folder here.  Windows will ask if you want to replace same-named folders on the drive.  Say “yes”.  You’re done!

That concludes Hindenburg class #1.  In class #2, we’ll talk about recording your own voice, arranging clips, and exporting audio.

Hindenburg Training – Class 2

Welcome back to Hindenburg Training at KFAI.

This is a three part training sequence designed to make you more comfortable with using Hindenburg for editing projects.  This is class #2.

At KFAI, we use Hindenburg on six different computers:

  • Studio 1
  • Studio 2
  • Studio 3
  • Studio 4 (on-air)
  • Newsroom Booth
  • Newsroom Corner

hindenburg_iconAt any of these computers, look for the red “H” Hindenburg icon on the task bar at the  bottom of the screen, or in the program menu.

Double Left click on the red H  to open a Hindenburg session.

Let’s revisit some of what you learned in Class #1.  This basic Hindenburg editing video (My First Segment) is more comprehensive than the beginning videos you watched in the first class, but it covers some of the same ground and will provide new information as well as giving you a helpful review.

Now let’s work on a project that involves recording your voice and mixing it with music.  In your folder, you’ll find a script and a sound file in a folder titled “Promo Project”.

Open the script, which is a .jpeg.  You’ll read it off the screen.

Next, open a new Hindenburg session and save it in your folder as “yourname_promo”

Enable a track for recording in your Hindenburg session.

Open your mike and start the recording.

Read through the copy several times.  When you’re finished, press the space bar to stop your recording.

Edit the narration until you are happy with it and place the finished version in your clipboard.

Next, open the folder called “Mystery Sound Effects” and import the sounds and music you’d like to use to illustrate the final product.

You can bring these directly into the clipboard by right-clicking on the clipboard section you wish to use.

Navigate to the “Mystery Sound Effects” folder, open it and highlight all the tracks.

This gives you a nice assortment of sounds to work with.  But you don’t need to use them all.  Sometimes less is more!  Get things arranged in a way that you think will work,  and when you’re done, save the session.

In lesson 3, we’ll learn about setting your levels and making fades, working with multiple tracks, and exporting the final audio.

Hindenburg Training – Class 3

Welcome back to Hindenburg Training at KFAI.

This is a training sequence designed to make you more comfortable with using Hindenburg for editing projects.  This is class #3.

In this lesson we’ll look at setting volumes, making fades and exporting your work.

First, let’s review how Hindenburg regions work, with a closer look at the volume (or “gain”) controls.

Now let’s take a look at the work you did in Lesson 2.

By now you should have your promo project underway with narration you recorded and a selection of sounds and music already brought into the edit window.

Let’s see how music levels can be adjusted in relation to a piece of narration.  Here you see the narration highlighted in track 1, with our eerie music highlighted in the clipboard.

We can drag the music into track 2 underneath the narration.
With a left to right swipe over the music track at a point near the beginning of the narration, we can highlight a portion of the music that will become the “fade zone” – the area where our music fade will happen.

Now, use the cursor to reach for the upper boundary of the music waveform at a point outside and to the right of the fade zone. Pull down the boundary to reduce the level for the remainder of the track, thus creating a “shelf fade”.

Now we’ll try a different technique.  Let’s go back to a point where the narration is in track 1 and the music is sitting underneath it in track 2.  This time, our left to right swipe will create a music “fade zone”  right underneath the narration.

The level of the shaded area can be brought down with a simple click and drag.

Now we can zoom out to see the end of the music track.  By grabbing the right boundary of the music, we can pull  it forward so the music ends shortly after the narration does.

Now it’s a simple matter to add some sound effects.  We’ve dragged the music into the third track and brought the sounds into track two. The narration has spread out a bit to create space for some sounds.

Here’s where you can really listen to your project to determine if the levels are appropriate.  Drag the top boundary of your sound effects chunks up or down to find the level that sounds best.  You don’t want to overwhelm your narration, but you also want to make sure the effects and the music are loud enough to be heard.  Consider that many of your listeners will hear your work while driving, and all elements of the mix will have to compete with road noise.

Once you have your tracks organized and levels set, you can unify them in a group so they will stay together.

Technique #1:  Highlight all three the tracks by shift-clicking on the titles at the left edge of the screen.  Then right click on one of the track titles and select “Link Tracks”

Technique #2:  Highlight all the audio on the screen by shift-clicking the different blocks and right click on one of the blocks to select “Group” (or use the keyboard to hit Ctrl + G)

Now it’s time to export the audio.  Make sure all tracks are included by checking the Mute / Solo buttons on the left side of the screen. Then right click on any piece of audio in the group and choose “Export Selection”.

You can make some exporting choices, including what type of file you want to create.

Take note of these variables:

You can also export audio directly from the clipboard.  Hindenburg shows you how.

Export from Clipboard